BLIND AFTER CATARACT SURGERY

by John D. Collier
(Jonesville, Virginia, U.S.A.)

I was told in 2012 after an eye exam by an Ophthalmologist that I had some small cataracts. It was suggested that I could have them removed. At the time I had at least 20/25 vision in either eye. I had good experience in the past with RK to correct my nearsightedness and had little fear of this procedure. I assumed all would go well. I had my right eye operation which turned out fine with no negative result and very good vision. My left eye was scheduled during the same year. During this surgery the capsule burst, the phacoemulsifier machine pulled the retina loose from the back of the eye. After surgery I was told by the doctor about the possible problem. My vision was blurry and I had a lot of internal pressure in the eye. Even knowing I had this high pressure I was medicated and sent home where the pain in the eye was unbearable. It was over a weekend and I was able to get back to the doctor who told me I had a detached retina and would have to see a retina specialist immediately or possibly lose my vision. I did as I was told reluctantly and the eye was operated on. I am now completely blind in the eye after five years and four retinal attachment procedures which all failed. There is little recourse for the patient. Unless you need cataract surgery you should give the idea plenty of thought before doing it. I lost a perfectly good eye, of course according to the industry, my age, my physical eye shape, etc. Pretty much all my fault and physical condition.
Please use caution, you can lose your eyesight from this procedure.

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Jul 26, 2018
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Fault ? NEW
by: Anonymous

Why is it your fault? Sounds like they are trying to pull the wool over your eyes! Get another opinion in another state.

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